Category Archives: CMMS Software – Advice

CMMS = Could Mean My Salary

I recently spent some time helping a well-known yogurt manufacturer improve their visibility into their daily maintenance process.  Their CMMS product is 10 years old, not updated with the correct patches, and the reporting software is equally as ancient.

The manager in charge of maintenance performance seemed less stressed this time as compared to last.  During my first visit he was newly appointed as the person who would take their CMMS and revamp the plant maintenance performance within a few months.  I’ve seen that type of pressure placed on people before.  So many times, in fact, that I have a name for it….CMMS (could mean my salary).  Because if this guy fails, he is probably out of a job.

So of course their is a wonderful transference of that same pressure onto the consultant who the plant was so kind as to bring in and help the guy with a CMMS on his forehead.  “Could Mean My Salary”, in case you forgot.

Well this yogurt man had actually taken that old CMMS and incorporated the changes we had identified during the first visit.  So needless to say he was much more relaxed, knowing that his upper management team believed in him (and me…through transference).

To make a long story short, and then sum up my point, this latest visit proved to be successful as we took old reporting software and used it to improve maintenance processes weaved throughout an equally rickety CMMS product.  More specifically, we eliminated 8 labor hours per week that were previously “empty” labor hours spent transferring data from the CMMS to Excel then comparing to a production schedule, etc.

We took a single report and with prompts made it variable enough to manage all scenarios.  So the 8 hours transferring data was replaced with a single report that could be launched at any time to pull the required information LIVE.

The Point?  CMMS either “could” mean your salary, or it can also “justify” your salary and make it grow.  And having the latest, greatest CMMS system is not a guarantee or precursor to success.  It’s more about the basic concepts of “minimal touch” information gathering and maintenance process efficiency.  If you want to learn more, email me directly: publish@eamuniversity.com

CMMS Decisions in 2010 – Due Diligence by Proxy

There has been a shift in behaviors shown by both consumer and B2B shoppers with respect to their due diligence process, decision-making, and purchasing actions.  During the past several years, these standard marketing and sales cycle steps have taken on more of a self-service approach.

During the upcoming year 2010, more than ever before, people will be using Google Search, Facebook, Twitter, Yahoo Answers, LinkedIn, and other sources to decide what products and services best meet their needs.  Almost completely gone are the days of picking up the phone and talking to a salesperson during the “information gathering phase”.

So, it’s more important than ever for vendors to show up with as many relevant web links and informational content as possible.  However, saturating the web with product information is no longer defined as simply throwing a blanket out with mass mailings.  The efficient approach to marketing is now defined as 1 to 1 – getting your message to the people who are interested in hearing it.

The most important element of reaching the right audience is to get your links into relevant industry directories, track the behavior of people who click your links, and know what your audience is doing on the internet, who they are, and which emails of yours they read.  For example, this site shows different companies and which CMMS / EAM system they chose: CMMS Success Stories.  This is an example of a relevant directory of information for CMMS vendors and shoppers.

Human nature shows that we listen to each other.  We believe in what others find valuable.  We know that the wheel should only be invented once.

As we seek similar and services, we read about what others think and do.   For example, my fantasy football lineup shows me a percentage across all teams of who is being started each week.  Based on that information I can assume a good portion of people are making educated decisions by starting a particular player, and you are naturally swayed toward doing the same.  Sometimes I have enough time to do more of my own research, but when I don’t, then I tend to go with the masses as a means of playing the percentages.  I assume those percentages are my best bet for success.  I play it safe.

For the CMMS world, I have a question:  Did your company choose MP2 (or another product) years ago because everybody else was doing the same?  Maybe.  The only difference is those folks started their evaluation by picking up the phone and asking for a demo to learn about the product.  They chose a list of products to demo after a corporate search team researched and created a long-list based on what other companies were purchasing in your industry.

Today, each individual location can do that same old corporate research right from their workstation on the Internet.  You can see what CMMS others are using, saying about their CMMS and so forth.  No more picking up the phone and calling a sales person… that is, until you are ready to purchase.

 

 

Managing IT Assets with CMMS

I’ve talked with more than one client recently who had this idea, which prompted me to ask around and see if there is a trend going recently that might warrant some exposure:  The burden of tracking IT assets (computers, servers, hardware and related serial numbers, peripherals, components, etc) is being handled at some companies using CMMS.  Sure, there are specific products designed for this IT asset management process, yet CMMS was not originally intended for that use.  My questions are where do systems fall down when compared to say, the IBM version specifically made for IT Asset Management?  If the fallbacks are few, it seems the dollar savings might be large if one can utilize an existing CMMS compared to obtaining a new, separate ITAM system.

Web Based CMMS Systems: Efficient, Mobile, and Environmentally Friendly

     “My facilities personnel are busy people.  They need to be out in the field getting work done … not sitting in front of a computer.”

    This familiar complaint has been repeated by my many facilities managers for quite sometime.  Their plea for help usually goes unanswered like someone yelling into a canyon and hearing the echo of their own voice.  

    But, thanks to advances in Computerized Maintenance Management Software (CMMS) technology, maintenance professionals are able access their work database from anywhere, using their BlackBerry®, cell phone, laptop or other mobile device.

     Web based CMMS systems can be installed on either the client’s internal server or it can be hosted by the CMMS provider.  The second option is known as an ASP (Application Service Provider).  For an ASP system, the customer doesn’t require any servers to run the application or the associated license costs for databases, network and security software.  Also, with an ASP system, no IT staff or resources are required.  The customer is only responsible for their internet connection. All other IT requirements are managed by the CMMS provider that is hosting the system.

     The inherent web programming in web based systems enables remote devices such as laptop computers, BlackBerry®, or cell phones to connect via the internet in real-time to the CMMS central database.  So, maintenance professionals working out in the field can have immediate access to the following features:

  • Receive, review and modifying work orders
  • Record asset data from anywhere around the globe
  • Recall critical asset information in real-time
  • Review, order & monitor inventory and spare parts data
  • Monitor project status and material or labor assignments
  • Update field personnel in real-time
  • Automatically record time and materials utilized
  • Collect data and create reports

     This technology also enhances a company’s ability to manage assets in multiple locations with one fully integrated CMMS solution that ensures maximum efficiency of labor, equipment and asset management.

     Aside from allowing maintenance professionals to work more efficiently in the field, there is also an environmental benefit to using remote CMMS technology as it creates a paperless work environment.  It is no longer necessary to print all assigned work orders.  All daily work requirements can be stored and managed through the user’s mobile device. There is also a significant reduction in travel time between the job site and the central office or remote spare parts location.

     With the advancement of web based CMMS technology, maintenance professionals everywhere are now able to leave the confines of their stationary computer and work in an efficient, mobile and paperless real-time work environment.

Web Work by Tero was one of the first true web based CMMS systems.   The advantage of a web based CMMS system is that it can be accessed anywhere.  No software installation is needed.  All that is required is an internet connection and the user can login to their database from the office, home, or another city.

Web Work by Tero
www.tero.ca
Toll Free:  1-866-818-8376
Main Phone:  604-468-1401
General Email: sales@tero.ca

2 Huge Reasons to Invest in CMMS Software during a Recession

These days many companies are scaling back on expenditures of any kind. And, why not? It just makes sense. Obviously, the severe economic downturn has impacted organizations across the United States and the Globe. Capital conservation has become the rule and cutbacks are inevitable. Yet, this is the just the kind of environment that completely justifies investment in Computerized Maintenance Management Software for organizations seeking to lower costs and protect vital plant and equipment assets. That’s your responsibility, right? 

1 – Immediately Lower Operational Costs – Computerized Maintenance Management System (CMMS) Software provides an essential tool for managers working aggressively working to decrease downtime, inventory, material and contractor costs. Here’s how: 

Less DowntimeSimple: Decreased downtime means increased production.  A 1% improvement in productivity has 10 times the positive impact than a 1% reduction in costs. Imagine the gain in a production facility running 24 hours per day:  A conservative estimated gain of 24 hours of production per year pours thousands of dollars to the bottom line.  Savings estimate: Downtime cost of $2,500/Hour x 24 Hours = $60,000 annual profit increase. 

Reduced Inventory Elementary: Asset maintenance management allows you purchase inventory and parts when you need them instead of relying on guesswork. Without CMMS Software, managers might not know what is in their stockroom, can’t find what they need and, frequently end up buying parts they already have. Of course, CMMS Software allows you to lookup parts, check stock and order only as needed. Savings estimate: Reducing an $800,000 inventory just 10% with a 10% interest rate results in an annual savings of over $8,000 in an annual profit increase. 

Eliminate Contractor CostsSmart: Managed maintenance keeps repairs in-house using a more efficient work crew. CMMS Software focuses crew time on work orders designed to keep the plant moving. Result? No maintenance logjams requiring expensive contractor time. This outcome creates not only a savings on labor but also a savings on parts! Savings estimate: Using a realistic 10% annual reduction in labor and material costs on a budget of $680,000 you return another $68,000 to the bottom line.

2 – Increase Maintenance Productivity Right Now – Better work planning and scheduling maximizes crew efficiency while focusing crew time on work orders designed to keep the plant moving.  Productivity increases of 10% to 20% using modern CMMS Software are standard. Maintenance managers know that saving just 60 minutes (12.5%) per day for each worker in a six-person crew at a $30/hr labor rate for 250 days/year can preserve $45,000 annually for the organization. 

When implemented properly, a Computerized Maintenance Management System using CMMS Software can be a huge cost and time saving addition to your organization’s bottom line. Isn’t that what your objective is?  

Sure, CMMS Software costs money.

Our company, MAPCON Technologies, Inc. can get you started for $495. In fact, you can download and evaluate MAPCON’s CMMS Software free for 30 days.

Realistically, though most sizable organizations invest several thousand dollars to get properly setup and have authorized personnel trained up.

But, with a prudently estimated return-on-investment (ROI) of over 1000% (yes, one thousand percent!), your CMMS Software investment is intelligent, wise and – urgent!

   Author: 

Mapcon Technologies, Inc.
8665 Harbach Blvd., Suite B
Clive, Iowa 50325
Tel  1.800.922.4336
Email sales@mapcon.com
Website: http://www.mapcon.com/US-EN/CMMS-Software-Products

CMMS is only a "piece" of Maintenance Process Improvements

I do quite a bit of training on MP2 CMMS across North America.  As I visit sites and work with maintenance teams, there are some similaritieis worth sharing.  Regardless of whether the maintenance business I am working with is tasked to maintain assets within either Manufacturing or Facilities, the underlying challenges remain similar.

My point today is to stress that maintenance improvements can be realized WAY before CMMS is installed and configured.  In fact, without some diligent planning before a CMMS is purchased and implemented, there is a pretty good chance you won’t have a clue HOW to configure the CMMS system you just dropped hard-earned budget dollars into.

Here are some simple steps to maintenance improvements (at a high level):

  • Define current maintenance processes
  • Brainstorm ideas on how to improve current maintenance processes
  • Draw up a plan for future maintenance processes
  • Evaluate and purchase a CMMS that will serve as a tool with all the bells and whistles required to meet your future maintenance processes
  • Configure the new CMMS to match your new maintenance processes
  • Set a timetable to transition into the new maintenance processes

These steps are simplified and presented at a high level to highlight my point that CMMS is only part of the required process.

If you would like to learn more, please feel free to visit us at www.mp2training.com

Let's light this candle

CMMS Advice is a blog dedicated to centralizing information for folks interested in learning more about CMMS (Computerized Maintenance Management Software), or on a larger scale EAM (Enterprise Asset Management) Software. The format of this blog will be a free-form mixture of opinions, articles and whitepapers with CMMS or EAM as the central common thread. This blog is being powered and funded by Software Net ( www.software-directory.net ) and specifically the CMMS category, also represented on the web by the CMMS Resource Center ( www.cmms-directory.com ), the original CMMS internet directory (www.cmmsglobal.com) and the latest CMMS informational portal for “All Things EAM / CMMS” ( www.eamuniversity.com ).  Please send suggestions for future expansion areas. We are cooking up some ideas of our own !