Tag Archives: asset management

Asset Criticality and Risk Ranking – Recorded Webinar

Wouldn’t it be useful to know precisely how much time and resource should be applied to each of your assets?  With Asset Criticality, organizations are able to rate assets to determine how critical each piece of equipment is to areas such as safety, product quality, customer issues, environmental issues, and production.

During this 40 minute recorded session, guest speaker Terry Harris from Reliable Process Solutions LLC provides an overview of Asset Criticality and Risk Ranking and discusses how to:

  1. Derive the criticality rating for each piece of equipment
  2. Understand which equipment is important and critical to the process
  3. Assign resources and time based on equipment criticality value

The Enterprise Energy Asset Management Benefits

Data gathered by companies from its energy systems will be used to analyze energy efficiency to help decision makers take action on improving its energy facilities and procedures. With the Climate Registry pressuring companies to reduce energy use, carbon emissions will be reduced to eventually help reduce global warming potential (GWP).

Facilities, companies, municipalities and organizations across North America, its’ states, provinces, territories and native sovereign nations, participate in a voluntary agreement. The Climate Registry works towards a common goal to identify, track and record greenhouse gas emissions. This is an ongoing effort to help in the reduction of global warming.

Emissions reporting is an important element included in the Climate Registry. The standardized procedure calls for companies to identify harmful emissions and to establish methods to manage them. Current and future greenhouse gas emissions can be managed, with the goal of reducing the company’s carbon footprint.

Within an electrical distribution grid, energy asset management covers all sources — distributed generation of energy, energy storage devices and renewable energy sources. As constant, real-time monitoring of indirect and direct sources is required, asset management software is indicated as these programs can best handle multiple sources and locations around the world.

In addition to tracking real-time energy use, greenhouse gas emissions from specific energy related assets can be tracked by efficient energy asset management. Included with this are HVAC systems, refrigeration, lighting, vehicle and transport, among many other types of equipment. Energy reduction efforts can be tracked in this way.

Protocols are provided by the Climate Registry to assist in energy asset management programs. These guidelines include an in-depth analysis of asset specific attributes linked to energy use. For a more accurate measure of harmful emission sources and energy sources, automated programs are highly recommended. The software programs can provide a greater oversight, and an hourly record of asset energy consumption.

Short and long-term objectives are defined through energy asset management with regards to energy consumption. Opportunistic areas are revealed and a plan of action can be put in place. Considering that energy is one of the top three largest operational expenses of any enterprise, any company’s goal would be to reduce energy risk and improve performance in its operations. Energy risk factors associated with design and operation can be identified as part of a comprehensive plan to manage all energy sources.

Elements which create practical opportunities for companies can be combined with any asset management program which can help monitor and save on energy use. Several things are achieved, including energy reduction, cost control and for all environmental health.

The Sustainability Resource Planning (SRP) platform delivers a broad range of enterprise solutions to over 40 global clients with a service network of over 7,500 consultants consisting of 65,000 application users. Verisae’s software manages, and monetizes energy costs and carbon emissions while providing a rapid ROI. Learn more at http://www.verisae.com/articles.

Author: Daniel Stouffer
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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Why Your Business Needs a CMMS Vendor

Do we need computerized maintenance management software (commonly known as CMMS)? It’s the question on the lips of many business managers seeking to improve the bottom line via improved tracking of business expenses and functions. Out on the proverbial shop floor, the question might be more along the lines of “what is CMMS anyway?”

But the question everyone should be asking is “Why haven’t we found a CMMS vendor yet?”

With CMMS, you can manage the schedule for everything from basic maintenance of equipment to calibrating of instruments, gauges and other delicate equipment.

The fine-tuning reaches beyond maintenance of equipment and into the business aspect of maintenance management: employee shift schedules, cost analysis, supply inventory and more. It even allows management to analyze overall maintenance performance.

All types of organizations will benefit from CMMS. It provides the ability to track tasks of all types. It organizes not only scheduled maintenance tasks, but also un-scheduled maintenance management tasks (those unexpected yet necessary repairs). It also and it creates documentation for both types of maintenance.

And we’re not just talking about software to use at the computer. Most CMMS is available as SaaS (Software As A Service). This online capability is also known as cloud computing. That means less of a need for hands-on IT work plus fewer equipment expenses. Wireless capabilities allows employees and managers can access the software from wherever they might be and with the PDA or smart phone device that is handiest.

Most CMMS vendors provide multiple versions of the software that allow each business to pick the plan that will fit most closely with the business needs. And as your needs change, you can typically add on new modules to fit the new demand.

CMMS offers more than ‘just’ the ability to track maintenance of equipment. The benefits are not solely in maintenance-CMMS can also track your business’ research, environmental, safety, regulatory compliance and quality. Now…what was that question again? That’s right. Why haven’t we found a CMMS vendor yet?

Ashcom Technologies provides knowledge-based business solutions to clients through a multitude of strategies and tools. In the process, clients receive a sustainable competitive advantage through the implementation of proactive strategies & technologies. CMMS plays a large role in this process.

3917 Research Park Drive
Ann Arbor MI 48108
Phone: 1800-366-0793

Author: Ashley Combs
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
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The Hardhead of a Maintenance Man, by Guest Blogger Joel Levitt

eMaint invites guest speakers to present at our popular Best Practices webinars, so why not have them give their two cents on our blog as well. It is our hope to feature a guest blogger, whether it’s an industry professional or an eMaint employee, each month.

Feel free to suggest topics you’d like to have discussed or let us know how useful these blog posts are.

The Hardhead of a Maintenance Man

This may be challenging to you. But why on earth are maintenance folks so hardheaded?

Actually it turns out to be a smart trait. Maintenance folks are hardheaded because they are (sometimes) speaking into intentional (and potentially contagious) ignorance! When you have to do that day in and day out you get hardheaded. Just to do your job (preservation of asset capacity) you have to be hard headed.

What are the symptoms of working in a company suffering from intentional (and potentially contagious) ignorance? Some of the main symptoms concern consequences. What to look for is a wholesale lack of appreciation of consequences.

•When we run equipment beyond its limits there will be consequences.
•When we allow operators run machines without adequate training there will be consequences.
•When we refuse to shut down for a well-designed PM there will be consequences.
•When are stockroom is depleted of expensive critical spares because they have not been used there will be consequences.
•When we do a temporary repair and never get back to fix it right, there will be consequences
There is a dark side to hardheadedness- inability to admit a mistake. Hardheadedness works so often it is very hard to admit when the reality goes against us. It gives us a reputation of being hard to work with and allows us to get away with not listening.

The truth is that sometimes the business necessity trumps good maintenance practice. Boy is it tough to tell when it does. In fact the only way to tell is by listening to our comrades in arms (operations). But that is a whole different story.

To complete this story be aware that hardheadedness is a valuable trait. It is most powerful when it is tempered by the ability to really listen to people and always consider that we might really be wrong! Oh yes and get over ourselves!

About the Author: Joel Levitt President of Springfield Resources

Joel Levitt is a leading maintenance educator and has trained more than 15,000 maintenance leaders from 3,000 organizations in 20 countries. Since 1980 he has been president of Springfield Resources, a management/consulting firm that has developed solutions for clients with a wide range of maintenance issues. Joel is a frequent speaker at maintenance and engineering conferences, has written 10 popular books, and has published over 6 dozen articles on the subject.

How To Handle The Before, During and After of Any Maintenance Outage

This month Randy Pound, President and CEO of Solved Inc., hosted eMaint’s monthly Best Practices Webinar on Planning, Scheduling and Executing Outages.

Outages or shutdowns are the most critical aspect of maintenance reliability. Through careful planning and standardization, any organization can excel at managing outages. Randy Pound  runs through some key steps to consider before, during and after an outage.

First, the reliability and production team must work together not only during an outage but also through daily activities. Performing as one team at all times will lead any company to success.

Each organization should consider the following:

Before an outage:

– Make sure each individual has the applied skills to handle their aspect of the outage

– Make sure that the available parts are fit for the service

-Have each technician ready to jump in when equipment is shut down in order to reduce loss of profitability

During an outage:

– Use available technicians that are skilled to handle each specific outage

– Standardize work to increase efficiency with each shutdown

-Make sure to take down accurate measurements

After an outage:

– Analyze measurements taken during outage

-Write down best practices that you experienced during an outage

-Work through team building activities

 

Watch the free video recording now for a more in depth view at planning, scheduling and executing outages.

Getting Lean with Better Performance Maintenance and Tracking

The best way to get fit and stay fit is to maintain an exercise regimen and eat less junk. The same is true for your plant and equipment. By implementing a planned maintenance program and identifying maintenance waste items, you can create an environment where lean maintenance and lean manufacturing coexist. In the long run, you could improve reliability, realize significant gains in process efficiencies, and reduce the costs of maintenance activities.

Read how one food and beverage manufacturer has done just that.

Have you implemented lean strategies to leverage the full value of your assets? What maintenance regimens do you have in place to address equipment and plant repairs? Are you implementing lean on the factory floor? We’d love to hear your thoughts and ideas. Please leave a comment to this post.

Take a Virtual Tour of Plant Efficiency

Companies are realizing that it’s no longer enough just to monitor assets. The time has come to proactively detect problems and drive corrective actions, as well as factor energy into maintenance plans, in order to stay competitive and grow. But how does an enterprise asset management (EAM) solution actually work on the shop floor to help reduce energy consumption and costs and keep your plant operating at its maximum efficiency?  

Take this interactive tour of Tricon Manufacturing, a virtual manufacturing plant, to see how EAM can help you:

  • Manage energy consumption.
  • Operate more efficiently.
  • Predict your assets’ health.

Once you’re in the plant, you’ll see six hotspots representing Infor EAM and Infor ERP solutions’ strengths. Click on +signs to open a pop-up box and access key EAM assets, including customer videos, demos, papers, case studies, and more.

How do you envision asset management working in your plant? Share your thoughts and ideas by leaving a comment to this post.