Tag Archives: facilities maintenance

Asset Criticality and Risk Ranking – Recorded Webinar

Wouldn’t it be useful to know precisely how much time and resource should be applied to each of your assets?  With Asset Criticality, organizations are able to rate assets to determine how critical each piece of equipment is to areas such as safety, product quality, customer issues, environmental issues, and production.

During this 40 minute recorded session, guest speaker Terry Harris from Reliable Process Solutions LLC provides an overview of Asset Criticality and Risk Ranking and discusses how to:

  1. Derive the criticality rating for each piece of equipment
  2. Understand which equipment is important and critical to the process
  3. Assign resources and time based on equipment criticality value

The Enterprise Energy Asset Management Benefits

Data gathered by companies from its energy systems will be used to analyze energy efficiency to help decision makers take action on improving its energy facilities and procedures. With the Climate Registry pressuring companies to reduce energy use, carbon emissions will be reduced to eventually help reduce global warming potential (GWP).

Facilities, companies, municipalities and organizations across North America, its’ states, provinces, territories and native sovereign nations, participate in a voluntary agreement. The Climate Registry works towards a common goal to identify, track and record greenhouse gas emissions. This is an ongoing effort to help in the reduction of global warming.

Emissions reporting is an important element included in the Climate Registry. The standardized procedure calls for companies to identify harmful emissions and to establish methods to manage them. Current and future greenhouse gas emissions can be managed, with the goal of reducing the company’s carbon footprint.

Within an electrical distribution grid, energy asset management covers all sources — distributed generation of energy, energy storage devices and renewable energy sources. As constant, real-time monitoring of indirect and direct sources is required, asset management software is indicated as these programs can best handle multiple sources and locations around the world.

In addition to tracking real-time energy use, greenhouse gas emissions from specific energy related assets can be tracked by efficient energy asset management. Included with this are HVAC systems, refrigeration, lighting, vehicle and transport, among many other types of equipment. Energy reduction efforts can be tracked in this way.

Protocols are provided by the Climate Registry to assist in energy asset management programs. These guidelines include an in-depth analysis of asset specific attributes linked to energy use. For a more accurate measure of harmful emission sources and energy sources, automated programs are highly recommended. The software programs can provide a greater oversight, and an hourly record of asset energy consumption.

Short and long-term objectives are defined through energy asset management with regards to energy consumption. Opportunistic areas are revealed and a plan of action can be put in place. Considering that energy is one of the top three largest operational expenses of any enterprise, any company’s goal would be to reduce energy risk and improve performance in its operations. Energy risk factors associated with design and operation can be identified as part of a comprehensive plan to manage all energy sources.

Elements which create practical opportunities for companies can be combined with any asset management program which can help monitor and save on energy use. Several things are achieved, including energy reduction, cost control and for all environmental health.

The Sustainability Resource Planning (SRP) platform delivers a broad range of enterprise solutions to over 40 global clients with a service network of over 7,500 consultants consisting of 65,000 application users. Verisae’s software manages, and monetizes energy costs and carbon emissions while providing a rapid ROI. Learn more at http://www.verisae.com/articles.

Author: Daniel Stouffer
Article Source: EzineArticles.com
Panasonic Lumix G2

Can Maintenance People be "Happy"?

I’ve been working in the maintenance industry for the past 22 years.  My first foray into this mechanized world of grease, wrenches, and safety shutoffs happened immediately after graduating as a mechanical engineer in the late 1980’s.

Since then I have migrated into the world of maintenance management consulting.  This journey succeeded due to my learning maintenance software early on (DOS, remember that?), applying its power to my real world surroundings, and showing results to upper management with pretty pie charts and numbers that made them smile.

So when the creators of this CMMS blog asked me for advice on how it should look, I advised them to somehow show people that maintenance professionals can also smile, and be  happy, just like those upper management people who are easily dazzled by pie charts and excellent numbers.

So they took my advice and made the first blog branding logo a “dancing maintenance guy”.

You can watch this happy dude dancing all day long at the top right corner of this blog.  Sure, it can be puzzling to see him rockin’ that tool belt.  Does such a creature actually exist?  Is there anything besides the lunch buzzer or breaking away from work that really makes a maintenance technician happy?  And what about their supervisors and managers?  Ever see them smile (let alone dance)?

By our nature, maintenance people are motivated by a challenge to solve technical, mechanical, electrical issues.  Fix things.  And fix them well.

Motivation, of course, is to feel that rush of accomplishment (which can lead to a smile, and when it happens repeatedly, will certainly lead to a quick jig).

Here is how it can work:

The maintenance team will many times need to troubleshoot an issue to find the root cause.  Other times, the cause is pretty obvious.  In either case, the maintenance team will only need a few simple things to achieve  that goal to “fix it well”.

  • We need spare parts.
  • We need authority to make decisions that help speed the process.
  • We need efficient access to information to help define the problem clearly (equipment specifications, repair history, backup plans, safety plans, troubleshooting guides).

So, I hate to state the obvious, but knowing that all we need are these (and possibly a few other simple items) to help us stay on track and be motivated, wouldn’t you think that the answer is yes, happiness can be achieved, and maintained.  All we need is a simple process that is understood and followed by the whole team.

However, companies tend to under-support their maintenance staff, which is not only a problem with less dancing, but also lower productivity overall.

  1. Start with looking at managing all your maintenance data with a maintenance software system.
  2. Next, go through every single minute of a typical day and determine how you can reach the perfect world of all issues getting fixed, and less issues coming up (preventive maintenance).
  3. Then give the technicians the chance to take ownership of success and failure.

Next time you see a frowning maintenance person, realize that turning that frown upside down, and possibly even seeing them dance, is achievable and probably desirable.  Find out what’s missing.

If you feel that seeing your people dance is unachievable, here is another place to learn about resources available to you: EAM University

Retailers Can Defy Energy Costs

Retailers are just like you and me when it comes to monitoring and reducing energy consumption. We’re always looking for ways to cut energy costs and improve energy efficiency in our homes. However, generally unlike our homes, lighting in commercial buildings is the largest energy drain and can account for over 35% of a business’ energy use. That means any reduction in their energy costs can amount to a big boost to the bottom line.

To help stop eroding profit margins, many retailers are taking a new approach to improve asset operating performance: global asset sustainability. By monitoring and managing assets’ energy consumption, retailers can get a better handle on what assets consume the most energy and begin to control and reduce energy waste to improve operating, financial, and environmental performance.

In this article from Professional Retail Store magazine, I explain how retailers can implement energy intelligence into your asset management strategy and reduce your carbon footprint, become more energy efficient, and ultimately impact profits.

What are you doing to reduce energy consumption? What programs do you have in place to manage your assets’ energy usage?

As always, I welcome your comments and feedback.

Posted by Rod Ellsworth, Vice President of Global Asset Sustainability, Infor

Six Ways to Educate Your CFO on Energy Management Benefits

What person is responsible for managing the costs and communications associated with your company’s energy consumption? Most likely it’s a number of departments: purchasing, responsible for securing energy and initiating tax rebates; HR, which manages internal communications to current and new employees; and investor relations, involved in CO2 emissions disclosers to investors and other external organizations.

It’s also very likely that all of these departments report to your company’s CFO. But a current survey conducted by Groom Energy is finding that most CFOs don’t consider energy management a priority in controlling costs or setting budget. If you’re involved in energy management, this could be a prime opportunity for you to pitch the cost savings and strategic benefits of efficient energy management and sustainability. But where do you start?

Read this article, “Energy Management Not a Priority for Many CFOs” (Paul Baier, Energy Groom on GreenBiz.com, December 22, 2010) to learn six ways to educate your CFO and bring him/her into the sustainability camp through realizing cost benefits, improved competitiveness, and environmental accountability.

What steps are you taking to justify an energy management program? I’d like to hear your thoughts and ideas. Please leave a comment to this post.


Posted by
Rod Ellsworth, Vice President of Global Asset Sustainability, Infor 

Maintenance KPI’s – An easy way to define yours

I’ve worked in the plant maintenance industry for years.  How did KPI’s look in those days? Here is an example KPI in 1988: “Keep the machines running”.

Fresh out of engineering school and thrown into the corporate engine, my life was all about keeping the conveyor belts running.  That was the priority (and still is, but said differently) at United Parcel Service so that little Jimmy would get his red wagon in time for Christmas.   Although we had no clue that they had a name (KPIs), here was our mission during the UPS days:

  • Keep the belts running
  • Get your PM’s done
  • Anything stopped for 15 minutes was a breakdown
  • Make sure mechanics knew how to make a repair the UPS way
  • That is..because every action that a mechanic took was measured using a DOS program built by UPS (called PEMMS)

Now UPS was way ahead of their time with work measurement, starting, of course, among the fleet delivery drivers.  They moved that successful approach to every aspect of the business, including maintenance.

Now the world is catching up to such great role models like UPS.  However, the aspect of defining KPI’s has still been somewhat behind the curve.  KPIs can be a mystery unless you happen to be a maintenance professional with enough hours available in the day for reading all the great maintenance measurement books available.  Show me one of those people and I will immediately tell you that that person is a consultant.  (No offense to the great consultants.  I am guilty as charged)

Once again the Internet is bailing us out by saving a ton of time and making KPI definitions easier to grasp and define (without having to read a novel then construct a maintenance business plan, etc).

Here is example KPI where you can see the industry baseline then work your own numbers by taking a survey: Preventative maintenance hours as a percentage of total maintenance hours

Managing IT Assets with CMMS

I’ve talked with more than one client recently who had this idea, which prompted me to ask around and see if there is a trend going recently that might warrant some exposure:  The burden of tracking IT assets (computers, servers, hardware and related serial numbers, peripherals, components, etc) is being handled at some companies using CMMS.  Sure, there are specific products designed for this IT asset management process, yet CMMS was not originally intended for that use.  My questions are where do systems fall down when compared to say, the IBM version specifically made for IT Asset Management?  If the fallbacks are few, it seems the dollar savings might be large if one can utilize an existing CMMS compared to obtaining a new, separate ITAM system.

Web Based CMMS Systems: Efficient, Mobile, and Environmentally Friendly

     “My facilities personnel are busy people.  They need to be out in the field getting work done … not sitting in front of a computer.”

    This familiar complaint has been repeated by my many facilities managers for quite sometime.  Their plea for help usually goes unanswered like someone yelling into a canyon and hearing the echo of their own voice.  

    But, thanks to advances in Computerized Maintenance Management Software (CMMS) technology, maintenance professionals are able access their work database from anywhere, using their BlackBerry®, cell phone, laptop or other mobile device.

     Web based CMMS systems can be installed on either the client’s internal server or it can be hosted by the CMMS provider.  The second option is known as an ASP (Application Service Provider).  For an ASP system, the customer doesn’t require any servers to run the application or the associated license costs for databases, network and security software.  Also, with an ASP system, no IT staff or resources are required.  The customer is only responsible for their internet connection. All other IT requirements are managed by the CMMS provider that is hosting the system.

     The inherent web programming in web based systems enables remote devices such as laptop computers, BlackBerry®, or cell phones to connect via the internet in real-time to the CMMS central database.  So, maintenance professionals working out in the field can have immediate access to the following features:

  • Receive, review and modifying work orders
  • Record asset data from anywhere around the globe
  • Recall critical asset information in real-time
  • Review, order & monitor inventory and spare parts data
  • Monitor project status and material or labor assignments
  • Update field personnel in real-time
  • Automatically record time and materials utilized
  • Collect data and create reports

     This technology also enhances a company’s ability to manage assets in multiple locations with one fully integrated CMMS solution that ensures maximum efficiency of labor, equipment and asset management.

     Aside from allowing maintenance professionals to work more efficiently in the field, there is also an environmental benefit to using remote CMMS technology as it creates a paperless work environment.  It is no longer necessary to print all assigned work orders.  All daily work requirements can be stored and managed through the user’s mobile device. There is also a significant reduction in travel time between the job site and the central office or remote spare parts location.

     With the advancement of web based CMMS technology, maintenance professionals everywhere are now able to leave the confines of their stationary computer and work in an efficient, mobile and paperless real-time work environment.

Web Work by Tero was one of the first true web based CMMS systems.   The advantage of a web based CMMS system is that it can be accessed anywhere.  No software installation is needed.  All that is required is an internet connection and the user can login to their database from the office, home, or another city.

Web Work by Tero
www.tero.ca
Toll Free:  1-866-818-8376
Main Phone:  604-468-1401
General Email: sales@tero.ca