Tag Archives: machine reliability

How To Handle The Before, During and After of Any Maintenance Outage

This month Randy Pound, President and CEO of Solved Inc., hosted eMaint’s monthly Best Practices Webinar on Planning, Scheduling and Executing Outages.

Outages or shutdowns are the most critical aspect of maintenance reliability. Through careful planning and standardization, any organization can excel at managing outages. Randy Pound  runs through some key steps to consider before, during and after an outage.

First, the reliability and production team must work together not only during an outage but also through daily activities. Performing as one team at all times will lead any company to success.

Each organization should consider the following:

Before an outage:

– Make sure each individual has the applied skills to handle their aspect of the outage

– Make sure that the available parts are fit for the service

-Have each technician ready to jump in when equipment is shut down in order to reduce loss of profitability

During an outage:

– Use available technicians that are skilled to handle each specific outage

– Standardize work to increase efficiency with each shutdown

-Make sure to take down accurate measurements

After an outage:

– Analyze measurements taken during outage

-Write down best practices that you experienced during an outage

-Work through team building activities

 

Watch the free video recording now for a more in depth view at planning, scheduling and executing outages.

Getting Lean with Better Performance Maintenance and Tracking

The best way to get fit and stay fit is to maintain an exercise regimen and eat less junk. The same is true for your plant and equipment. By implementing a planned maintenance program and identifying maintenance waste items, you can create an environment where lean maintenance and lean manufacturing coexist. In the long run, you could improve reliability, realize significant gains in process efficiencies, and reduce the costs of maintenance activities.

Read how one food and beverage manufacturer has done just that.

Have you implemented lean strategies to leverage the full value of your assets? What maintenance regimens do you have in place to address equipment and plant repairs? Are you implementing lean on the factory floor? We’d love to hear your thoughts and ideas. Please leave a comment to this post.

Predictive Technologies Enhance Equipment Reliability

I’m a Weather Channel junkie…I’m fascinated by weather in general and how it affects our lives, every day, all around the globe. What’s even more fascinating to me is how the meteorologists are able to accurately (well, almost always) predict weather conditions for nearly every corner of our planet, days—sometimes weeks—in advance.

Thousands of years ago, people simply watched the sky to determine weather patterns. As the centuries progressed, so did meteorological technology. Now armed with satellites, computer modeling, and analytic skills, meteorologists have the tools they need to report accurate forecasts to help us plan our days and not get caught in a rainstorm without an umbrella.

Weather forecasting got me thinking about predicting asset conditions—even imminent failure—and the tools that we have at our fingertips to help avoid problems. Having the right tools to monitor and measure the condition of your assets can help detect when changes occur in an asset’s condition and enable you to predict and address problems before they occur (like take an umbrella to work when there’s rain in the forecast). Just like meteorological technology, the tools and technologies used to monitor assets have increasingly become more sophisticated and give us a real-time view of how they operate on a daily basis.

Sheila Kennedy of Plant Services wrote this great article about advancements in predictive tools and products being delivered by a number of companies, including Infor. The tools feature improvements in connectivity, usability, portability, and affordability.

What technology and/or tools do you use to monitor your assets and circumvent problems? What advances have you seen in the evolution of monitoring processes and analysis? I welcome your thoughts and ideas.

Posted by Scott O. Hall, Account Manager, Professional Services, Infor EAM

The Evolution of EAM: From a Preventive Maintenance to a Reliability Strategy

Guest post by Sylvelie Franke, Director Marketing, Strategic Solutions, Infor EAM

Asset management has been around for decades and is now considered a mature industry. But, that’s all changing with the evolution—transition, if you like—of the technology and the inclusion of energy, automation, and business intelligence (BI) to really have an impact on your operational, financial, and energy efficiency performance.

Infor’s John Murphy, director of Solutions Management, sat down with the editor from Manufacturing Business Technology in this interview to discuss the latest tools, technologies, and strategies that companies are implementing to get a holistic view of all of their assets and how they’re using this real-time information to manage their assets more efficiently.

“More and more of our customers are moving toward incorporating advanced reliability and risk management techniques,” said Murphy. “They are trying to make better use of real-time information, including energy usage, to help them understand the health and financial performance of equipment. Turning the wealth of real-time information into intelligence is not easy, but when done right provides companies with an accurate perspective on when the equipment performance is starting to degrade, so that they can respond at the right time.”

John also touches on asset management in the cloud, reliability, and mobile technology, and where maintenance management practices are heading in the future.

Read the entire article, “QA: The Latest Asset Management Strategies And Tools,” (Manufacturing Business Technology).

I Need My Equipment to Tell Me When It’s Hurt

The Automation on Maintenance

Imagine this: You have a work order software system that creates work orders without human intervention. How would this benefit your organization?

Let’s look at a couple of examples. Let’s say you have a building management system, or a production line automated by programmable logic controllers (PLCs) or some type of monitoring hardware. The data feeds into your work order management system, which applies intelligence to this data. When an event occurs that a certain rule identifies as an anomaly, the system automatically creates a work order containing the template information on what the problem is and how it needs to be corrected. The work order is then routed to the appropriate department for correction. The work order is completed, and the fault is documented. So, as a maintenance or reliability expert, how would this benefit you?

Let’s take a look at another example where such automation doesn’t exist. On one asset you have two failures that have the same failure code combination within a two-week period. How can a mechanic identify that this failure already happened last week? That mechanic would have to go into the work management system, pull up that equipment record, and look at the history to identify the problem. But what if the system kept track of these failures and automatically notified the mechanic that this is the same failure code combination?

As technology advances and CMMS or EAM evolves, the automation features improve. With the right asset management system in place you can add automation to your maintenance processes creating a more productive maintenance organization.

Are you implementing more automation into your maintenance processes? What efficiencies are you realizing? Please leave a comment to this post. I’d like to hear your thoughts and ideas.

 

Posted by Johnny Bofilios, Director, Global Asset Sustainability, Infor

Maintenance KPI’s – An easy way to define yours

I’ve worked in the plant maintenance industry for years.  How did KPI’s look in those days? Here is an example KPI in 1988: “Keep the machines running”.

Fresh out of engineering school and thrown into the corporate engine, my life was all about keeping the conveyor belts running.  That was the priority (and still is, but said differently) at United Parcel Service so that little Jimmy would get his red wagon in time for Christmas.   Although we had no clue that they had a name (KPIs), here was our mission during the UPS days:

  • Keep the belts running
  • Get your PM’s done
  • Anything stopped for 15 minutes was a breakdown
  • Make sure mechanics knew how to make a repair the UPS way
  • That is..because every action that a mechanic took was measured using a DOS program built by UPS (called PEMMS)

Now UPS was way ahead of their time with work measurement, starting, of course, among the fleet delivery drivers.  They moved that successful approach to every aspect of the business, including maintenance.

Now the world is catching up to such great role models like UPS.  However, the aspect of defining KPI’s has still been somewhat behind the curve.  KPIs can be a mystery unless you happen to be a maintenance professional with enough hours available in the day for reading all the great maintenance measurement books available.  Show me one of those people and I will immediately tell you that that person is a consultant.  (No offense to the great consultants.  I am guilty as charged)

Once again the Internet is bailing us out by saving a ton of time and making KPI definitions easier to grasp and define (without having to read a novel then construct a maintenance business plan, etc).

Here is example KPI where you can see the industry baseline then work your own numbers by taking a survey: Preventative maintenance hours as a percentage of total maintenance hours