Tag Archives: maintenance reporting

CMMS Evaluation, Selection and Cost Justification Webinar

Evaluation, Selection and Justification of CMMS

Recently, eMaint Enterprises invited Ralph “Pete” Peters, President of Maintenance Excellence Institute, to deliver a Free Best Practices Webinar on evaluating and cost justifying a CMMS. Ralph drew from a real life case study that featured Argentina’s largest steel maker, SIDERAR, to document the CMMS evaluation/selection process as well as projected benefits and ROI.

Ralph began by outlining the overall strategy for gaining maximum value from a CMMS:

  1. Determine the true need for CMMS
  2. Determine maintenance best practices
  3. The CMMS evaluation and selection process
  4. Clearly defining CMMS functional requirements
  5. Commitment to maintenance Best Practice implementation
  6. Use the CMMS implementation process to measure your progress.

To evaluate and compare CMMS systems, each organization must consider 5 factors:

  • Functional Requirements
  • Technical Requirements
  • Software Costs
  • Implemenation/Support
  • Qualitative Factors

After the selection and evaluation process, it is vital to cost justify the implementation of a CMMS with four important measures:

  • Craft Productivity Improvement
  • MRO Inventory Reduction
  • Value of increased Uptime/Capactiy
  • Major Projects completed sooner

However, it is always important to remember that one can not simply install a CMMS and expect resuslts, best practices must also be implemented and followed company-wide.

To dig deeper into the evaluation, selection and justification of CMMS, click here to watch the recording of the above webinar.

To view other best practice webinars click here.

Maintenance KPI’s – An easy way to define yours

I’ve worked in the plant maintenance industry for years.  How did KPI’s look in those days? Here is an example KPI in 1988: “Keep the machines running”.

Fresh out of engineering school and thrown into the corporate engine, my life was all about keeping the conveyor belts running.  That was the priority (and still is, but said differently) at United Parcel Service so that little Jimmy would get his red wagon in time for Christmas.   Although we had no clue that they had a name (KPIs), here was our mission during the UPS days:

  • Keep the belts running
  • Get your PM’s done
  • Anything stopped for 15 minutes was a breakdown
  • Make sure mechanics knew how to make a repair the UPS way
  • That is..because every action that a mechanic took was measured using a DOS program built by UPS (called PEMMS)

Now UPS was way ahead of their time with work measurement, starting, of course, among the fleet delivery drivers.  They moved that successful approach to every aspect of the business, including maintenance.

Now the world is catching up to such great role models like UPS.  However, the aspect of defining KPI’s has still been somewhat behind the curve.  KPIs can be a mystery unless you happen to be a maintenance professional with enough hours available in the day for reading all the great maintenance measurement books available.  Show me one of those people and I will immediately tell you that that person is a consultant.  (No offense to the great consultants.  I am guilty as charged)

Once again the Internet is bailing us out by saving a ton of time and making KPI definitions easier to grasp and define (without having to read a novel then construct a maintenance business plan, etc).

Here is example KPI where you can see the industry baseline then work your own numbers by taking a survey: Preventative maintenance hours as a percentage of total maintenance hours

CMMS = Could Mean My Salary

I recently spent some time helping a well-known yogurt manufacturer improve their visibility into their daily maintenance process.  Their CMMS product is 10 years old, not updated with the correct patches, and the reporting software is equally as ancient.

The manager in charge of maintenance performance seemed less stressed this time as compared to last.  During my first visit he was newly appointed as the person who would take their CMMS and revamp the plant maintenance performance within a few months.  I’ve seen that type of pressure placed on people before.  So many times, in fact, that I have a name for it….CMMS (could mean my salary).  Because if this guy fails, he is probably out of a job.

So of course their is a wonderful transference of that same pressure onto the consultant who the plant was so kind as to bring in and help the guy with a CMMS on his forehead.  “Could Mean My Salary”, in case you forgot.

Well this yogurt man had actually taken that old CMMS and incorporated the changes we had identified during the first visit.  So needless to say he was much more relaxed, knowing that his upper management team believed in him (and me…through transference).

To make a long story short, and then sum up my point, this latest visit proved to be successful as we took old reporting software and used it to improve maintenance processes weaved throughout an equally rickety CMMS product.  More specifically, we eliminated 8 labor hours per week that were previously “empty” labor hours spent transferring data from the CMMS to Excel then comparing to a production schedule, etc.

We took a single report and with prompts made it variable enough to manage all scenarios.  So the 8 hours transferring data was replaced with a single report that could be launched at any time to pull the required information LIVE.

The Point?  CMMS either “could” mean your salary, or it can also “justify” your salary and make it grow.  And having the latest, greatest CMMS system is not a guarantee or precursor to success.  It’s more about the basic concepts of “minimal touch” information gathering and maintenance process efficiency.  If you want to learn more, email me directly: publish@eamuniversity.com